The magic of flute: U-M Life Sciences Orchestra presents a free concert on April 14


 

Nearly 20 years ago, a young surgeon had an idea: What if the University of Michigan’s vast medical and science community had its own orchestra, to give give students and professionals a chance to express their musical talents and connect with one another and the community?

On Sunday, April 14, that surgeon will appear with the orchestra he envisioned, as its featured flute soloist.

David J. Brown, M.D., will play Carl Nielsen’s Concerto for Flute and Orchestra with the U-M Life Sciences Orchestra, to close out the ensemble’s 19th season of blending science and music.

Beginning at 7 p.m. in U-M’s Hill Auditorium under the baton of music director Chelsea Gallo, the LSO will present a program of works composed in four centuries.

The concert is free and open to the public, as is a pre-concert lecture at 6:15 p.m. by Gallo in the lower level of the building. No tickets are required, though the LSO accepts donations to support its concerts.

The concert will begin with Helix, a short but intense overture by Finnish composer and conductor Esa-Pekka Salonen. Written in 2005, it brings out the mathematical side of music; the LSO will present its Michigan premiere.

The flute will come to the fore in two pieces: Mozart’s overture from The Magic Flute, written in 1791 and conducted by the LSO’s assistant conductor Régulo Stabilito, and the Nielsen concerto.

Written in 1926, the concerto offers Brown a chance to show the musical talent that made him co-winner of the LSO’s most recent concerto competition. He is also Associate Dean and Associate Vice President for Health Equity and Inclusion at Michigan Medicine, U-M’s academic medical center, as well as an associate professor of pediatric otolaryngology who cares for young patients at U-M’s C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital.

Brown first came to U-M in the late 1990s as a resident physician, and approached the health system’s Gifts of Art program with the idea of starting an orchestra like the one he had played in during his medical school years at Harvard University. The LSO launched in 2000 and played its first concert in January 2001. After leaving U-M for further training and his first faculty position, Brown returned in 2011 and rejoined the LSO soon after.

The concert’s second half features the Symphony No. 4 in F minor of Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky, written in the late 1870s. With its opening brass fanfare symbolizing the hand of fate, its quotes from Russian folk music, and one movement that calls for string players to pluck their instruments rather than bow them, the piece draws on the talents of dozens of the LSO’s members. Nearly all of them are medical, health and science faculty, staff, students and alumni from across the university.

Gallo is a doctoral student, and Stabilito a master’s degree student, in the UMSMTD’s nationally known orchestral conducting program. Gallo holds the Gilbert S. Omenn, M.D. Music Director position with the LSO, made possible by a gift from its namesake, the first U-M executive vice president for medical affairs and a longtime supporter of the LSO. She is also a cover conductor with the Detroit Symphony Orchestra.

The orchestra is part of the Gifts of Art program, which brings the world of art and music to Michigan Medicine.

For information, visit http://lso.med.umich.edu/ or www.facebook.com/umlso, send e-mail to orchestra@umich.edu, or call (734) 936-ARTS.

Announcing the program for our April 14 concert, featuring guest soloist Dr. David Brown

Otolaryngologist David Brown, M.D., poses with his flute in the operating room

With the start of the New Year, the LSO has begun preparing for our concert on Sunday, April 14 at 7 p.m. in Hill Auditorium.

Please note the time change from the previously announced 4 p.m. start time!

The performance will feature guest soloist David J. Brown, M.D., co-winner of our Concerto Competition and Associate Vice President for Health Equity and Inclusion at Michigan Medicine, U-M’s academic medical center. He’ll perform Carl Nielsen’s Flute Concerto with the LSO. Brown is a founder of the LSO and a pediatric otolaryngologist at C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital.

Music director Chelsea Gallo has selected works to complement the Nielsen to round out the rest of the program. They are:

Helix, by Esa-Pekka Salonen, written in 2005

The Magic Flute Overture by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, which will be conducted by assistant conductor Regulo Stabilito

and the Symphony No. 4 in F minor by Pyotr Ilytch Tchaikovsky

The concert will be free and open to the public, with donations taken online and in person to support the LSO.  No tickets are required.

Welcome to our 19th season!

With the wave of Chelsea Gallo’s baton, the U-M Life Sciences Orchestra kicked off its 19th season of blending science and music on Sunday, Sept. 23 with its first rehearsal at the U-M School of Music, Theatre & Dance.

Newly named concertmaster Josh Jung, a life-support researcher and past co-winner of the LSO Concerto Competition, took up his position as musical leader of the orchestra. As always, the LSO includes amateur musicians from many areas of U-M’s health and science community, at all stages of their careers. See the full roster of musicians here.

The first rehearsal focused on the piece by Arnold Schoenberg that will form the centerpiece of the LSO’s Dec. 8 concert at Hill Auditorium. Drawn from the composter’s lesser-known tonal period, it’s an orchestration of a piano quartet written by Johannes Brahms, in which the orchestra’s many instruments become the voice of the original piano solo and accompanying string parts.

Assistant conductor Regulo Stabilito, a master’s degree student in conducting at U-M SMTD, was on hand to meet the members of the orchestra. He will lead two pieces by Johann Strauss in the concert, which will also include Richard Strauss’s tone poem Macbeth.

Gallo drew inspiration for the concert program from her own experiences conducting in Vienna — the city that connects Schoenberg and both Strausses. Be sure to put Saturday, Dec. 8 at 8 p.m. on your calendar so you don’t miss the LSO!

Concertmaster Josh Jung leads the 2018-2019 LSO in tuning during the first rehearsal

2018-2019 Season: Auditions & more!

The LSO is proud to announce plans for our 2018-2019 season — our 19th season of blending science and music! Once again, we’ll be led by music director Chelsea Gallo.

Our concerts will be earlier in the year than usual, thanks to available weekend dates at Hill Auditorium:

Saturday, December 8, 2018 – 8 p.m.

featuring an overture to be announced soon, and two major orchestral works:

Richard Strauss Macbeth 

Arnold Schoenberg’s orchestral arrangement of Brahms Piano Quartet Op. 25

Sunday, April 14, 2019 – 4 p.m.

featuring Dr. David Brown, co-winner of the LSO Concerto Competition, performing Nielsen’s Flute Concerto

If you are interested in auditioning for this year’s orchestra, the dates are: 

Sunday, Sept. 9, 11 am – 4 pm, U-M School of Music, Theatre & Dance Rooms 2058 and 2038

Monday, Sept. 10, 6:30 – 10:00 pm, U-M School of Music, Theatre & Dance Rooms 2026 and 2038

Tuesday, Sept. 11, 6:30 – 10:00 pm, U-M School of Music, Theatre & Dance Rooms 2026 and 2058

Wednesday, Sept. 12, 6:30 – 10:00 pm, U-M School of Music, Theatre & Dance Rooms 2020 and 2032

Sign up for an audition time here.

For more about auditions, including required excerpts for each instrument, visit this page.

The rehearsal schedule is available here.

Because of our concert schedule, all musicians must be able to attend all or nearly all rehearsals, especially in fall.

We look forward to having you audition for the LSO, or attend our concerts! If you have questions, please email orchestra@umich.edu.

Music as life support: Dr. Robert Bartlett and Josh Jung

When the LSO takes the stage of Hill Auditorium on May 2, Dr. Robert Bartlett will be in the double bass section, as he has been for nearly every concert since January 2001.

He’s a legend at U-M, and far beyond, as the surgeon and inventor who has led the development of life support technologies that have saved countless patients.

But he has also kept his love of music alive throughout his research and clinical career — and has encouraged others who work on his research team to do the same.

For this concert, one of those lab team members will take center stage, as the LSO’s featured soloist on Bruch’s Violin Concerto No. 1.

Josh Jung, a research technician in Bartlett’s Extracorporeal Life Support Research Laboratory, was named the co-winner of the LSO’s Concerto Competition last fall.

Come hear Josh, Dr. Bartlett and the rest of the LSO. Details here.

 

New videos from the LSO!

Several new videos bring the LSO to online viewers. See below for a short video made to promote our May 2 concert, as well as a Facebook Live video of members of the LSO performing in the U-M hospital lobby on April 26, and two videos of performances from our January 2018 concert:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Love and death and music: U-M Life Sciences Orchestra plays free concert on Wednesday, May 2

Chelsea Gallo leads performance of Mozart, Rachmaninoff, Prokofiev and Bruch, with LSO Concerto Competition co-winner Joshua Jung

 

Passion. Tragedy. Romance. Vengeance. Mourning. Peace.

These themes and more will come to life in musical form on the evening of Wednesday, May 2, when the University of Michigan Life Sciences Orchestra takes the stage of U-M’s Hill Auditorium for a free concert.

Beginning at 7:30 p.m., the LSO and special guest soloists will perform works on the dual theme of love and death, from across the classical spectrum. The orchestra, led by Chelsea Gallo, brings together medical, health and science faculty, staff, students and alumni from across the university.

The concert is free and open to the public, as is a pre-concert lecture at 6:45 p.m. by Gallo in the lower level of the building.

No tickets are required, though the LSO accepts donations to support its concerts. A new easy way to show support for the LSO is by texting the word ARTS to the number 50555, which will trigger a process to give $10 to the orchestra.

The concert will begin with the overture and opening scene of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s opera “Don Giovanni”, with opera students from the U-M School of Music, Theatre and Dance as featured soloists.

The tone poem “Isle of the Dead,” composed by Sergei Rachmaninoff and inspired by a painting of a lone mourner being rowed to an island cemetery, will follow, led by assistant conductor Tal Benatar

A musical evocation of the tragic love of Romeo and Juliet will open the second half, with selections from the ballet score by Sergei Prokofiev.

And the concert will close with the lush melodies of the first two movements of Max Bruch’s Violin Concerto No. 1, performed by Joshua Jung, a member of the LSO and co-winner of the orchestra’s 2018 Concerto Competition.

Gallo and Benatar are both students in the UMSMTD’s nationally known orchestral conducting program. Gallo holds the Gilbert S. Omenn, M.D. Music Director position with the LSO, made possible by a gift from its namesake, the first U-M executive vice president for medical affairs and a longtime supporter of the LSO.

The orchestra is part of the Gifts of Art program, which brings the world of art and music to Michigan Medicine, the U-M academic medical center. The LSO gives members an outlet for their musical talents and a chance to interact with one another across academic disciplines and professions. The orchestra made its concert debut in January 2001 and plays two free concerts each year.

For information, visit http://lso.med.umich.edu/ or www.facebook.com/umlso, send e-mail to orchestra@umich.edu, or call (734) 936-ARTS.

Warm music for a cold day: U-M Life Sciences Orchestra plays free concert on Sunday, Jan. 21

Chelsea Gallo leads performance of Beethoven, Weber and Shostakovich, with piano soloist Louis Nagel

ANN ARBOR, Mich. — No matter how cold it gets outside, the University of Michigan’s Hill Auditorium will fill with warm – and sometimes fiery – music on the afternoon of Sunday, January 21, when the U-M Life Sciences Orchestra takes the stage.

The LSO and special guest piano soloist Louis Nagel will present a free 4 p.m. performance of works from across the classical spectrum. The orchestra, led by Chelsea Gallo, brings together medical, health and science faculty, staff, students and alumni from across the university.

The concert is free and open to the public, as is a pre-concert lecture at 3:15 p.m. by Gallo and Nagel in the lower level of the building.

No tickets are required, though the LSO accepts donations to support its concerts. A new easy way to show support for the LSO is by texting the word ARTS to the number 50555, which will trigger a process to give $10 to the orchestra.

First on the program is German composer Carl Maria von Weber’s overture from the 1821 opera Der Freischütz, led by assistant conductor Tal Benatar.

Next, Ludwig von Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 3 in C minor, Op. 37, played by Nagel, an emeritus professor of music at U-M. Nagel, who is renowned as both a performer and teacher, retired from the U-M School of Music, Theatre & Dance in 2016 after 47 years.

The LSO will close out the concert by leaping forward more than a century to 1930s Russia, with Dmitri Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 5 in D minor, Op. 47.

Gallo and Benatar are both students in the UMSMTD’s nationally known orchestral conducting program. Gallo holds the Gilbert S. Omenn, M.D. Music Director position with the LSO, made possible by a gift from its namesake, the first U-M executive vice president for medical affairs and a longtime supporter of the LSO.

The orchestra is part of the Gifts of Art program, which brings the world of art and music to Michigan Medicine, the U-M academic medical center. The LSO gives members an outlet for their musical talents and a chance to interact with one another across academic disciplines and professions. The orchestra made its concert debut in January 2001 and plays two free concerts each year.

For information, visit http://lso.med.umich.edu/ or www.facebook.com/umlso, send e-mail to orchestra@umich.edu, or call (734) 936-ARTS.